Tag: sister rosetta tharpe

Brittany Howard – “That’s All” Sister Rosetta Tharpe Cover

Brittany Howard performing “That’s All” by Sister Rosetta Tharpe and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. Also features The Roots’s Questlove and Felicia Collins.

Mixtape Alert | History of Black Female Guitarists | Don’t Dance Her Down Boys

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Sometimes I forget that some people don’t know the full impact that black women had on rock n roll. If you didn’t know it was epic. Without the talent and energy of many wonderful women the state of music today would be blander than Cliff Richard eating a cucumber sandwich.

Read More: Mixtape Alert | History of Black Female Guitarists | Don’t Dance Her Down Boys

Sister Rosetta Tharpe: Early Influencer award to be given by Rock and Roll HOF

From Rolling Stone:

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has officially announced next year’s inductees: Bon Jovi, Dire Straits, the Moody Blues, the Cars and Nina Simone will all join the class of 2018. Sister Rosetta Tharpe will be given an Early Influence award.

Nina Simone died in 2003 and Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who has experienced a huge resurgence of interest in the past decade, died in 1973. The Hall of Fame is likely to bring in artists they inspired to perform their music.

Sister Rosetta Tharpe: Nominated for Rock Hall of Fame

From the Arkansas Times article by Stephanie Smittle:

Less than a week after a sign was unveiled in Cotton Plant to honor the rock pioneer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe became a first-time nominee for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. For fans of Tharpe’s, the accolades are obnoxiously overdue; not only is Sister Rosetta part of rock and roll’s complex story, but there’s good reason to argue that she’s the very inventor of the genre.

Out of the 19 nominees for the 2018 induction process, Sister Rosetta’s eligibility is the oldest; artists become eligible for induction 25 years after the release of their first record.

The induction process, a combination of public votes and ballots from music historians, goes like this, as stated on rockhall.com:

Each year, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Foundation’s nominating committee selects the group of artists nominated in the performer category. Ballots are then sent to more than 900 historians, members of the music industry and artists—including every living Rock Hall inductee—and the five performers receiving the most votes become that year’s induction class. Beginning in 2012, fans were given the chance to vote for the nominees they’d like to see inducted into the Rock Hall. The top five vote-getters in the public poll form one ballot, which is weighted the same as the rest of the submitted ballots.

That means you can weigh in if you’re so inclined, throwing your clicks behind five nominees in the fan vote here from now until 11:59 EST, Tuesday, December 5. That same month, inductees will be announced, and the induction ceremony will take place in Cleveland, Ohio on April 14, 2018.

Memphis Minnie – Biography by Barry Lee Pearson

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“Tracking down the ultimate woman blues guitar hero is problematic because woman blues singers seldom recorded as guitar players and woman guitar players (such as Rosetta Tharpe and Sister O.M. Terrell) were seldom recorded playing blues. Excluding contemporary artists, the most notable exception to this pattern was Memphis Minnie. The most popular and prolific blueswoman outside the vaudeville tradition, she earned the respect of critics, the support of record-buying fans, and the unqualified praise of the blues artists she worked with throughout her long career. Despite her Southern roots and popularity, she was as much a Chicago blues artist as anyone in her day. Big Bill Broonzy recalls her beating both him and Tampa Red in a guitar contest and claims she was the best woman guitarist he had ever heard.”

Read more at Memphis Minnie | Biography & History | AllMusic